100 city rankings

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oolala53
Posts: 9789
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 1:46 am
Location: San Diego, CA USA

100 city rankings

Post by oolala53 » Fri Mar 24, 2017 5:07 am

Weird. I have tried to post five times but nothing shows up. However, when I try to edit, the text is all there. Let's see if this makes it, even though it doesn't contain what I want.
Count plates, not calories. 10 years "during"
Age 67
SBMI Jan/10-30.8
1/12-26.8
3/13-24.9 +/- 8-lb. 3 yrs
9/17 22.8 (but more fluctuation)
3/18 22.2
2 yrs flux
6/21 22

There is no S better than Vanilla No S.

oolala53
Posts: 9789
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 1:46 am
Location: San Diego, CA USA

Post by oolala53 » Fri Mar 24, 2017 5:09 am

Let's see if I can add the original text now.

Nope! Sorry, all.

Google WalletHUb 2017's Fattest Cities

Boston area is relatively thin.

So is my city, San Diego.

Makes me wonder what these other cities must look like because I sure see evidence of overeating right here in SD.
Last edited by oolala53 on Fri Mar 24, 2017 3:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Count plates, not calories. 10 years "during"
Age 67
SBMI Jan/10-30.8
1/12-26.8
3/13-24.9 +/- 8-lb. 3 yrs
9/17 22.8 (but more fluctuation)
3/18 22.2
2 yrs flux
6/21 22

There is no S better than Vanilla No S.

Whosonfirst
Posts: 536
Joined: Thu Nov 16, 2006 12:32 pm

Post by Whosonfirst » Fri Mar 24, 2017 2:46 pm

https://wallethub.com/edu/fattest-citie ... ethodology

Looks like most of the top 20 are in the southern states. Having said that, I did a few assignments in Georgia and Alabama and ate the best fried chicken ever. The one place was very nondescript, had a wooden porch that needed repairs and after eating lunch there, I had to skip dinner.
https://twitter.com/SipeEngineering
Current weight(9/2020)-212 lbs.
Goal Weight- 205 lbs.
NoS Goal: >= 80% Success days

oolala53
Posts: 9789
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 1:46 am
Location: San Diego, CA USA

Post by oolala53 » Fri Mar 24, 2017 6:49 pm

You made it work!

Given that African American men are the demographic with the highest obesity rate (though still high among whites and Latinos, too), and this population map, the distribution makes sense. (Interestingly, higher income Afr. Amer. men and Hispanic men are more likely to be obese. Just the opposite for low income women and women without college degrees. I imagine there must be mind sets within these groups that legitimize overeating and high weights and make cutting food intake sound difficult and oppressive. This would make combatting the prevalence even tougher, though I would think No S would be a perfect first, if not only, step.) I'm going to try posting the link without using the url feature.
http://www.censusscope.org/us/map_nhblack.html

Here's one by state, 2015. Self-reported. Does that mean the rates might be higher?
https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/prevalence-maps.html

And this on poverty rates.
https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/prevalence-maps.html

And diabetes' spread (which is still only 9% of the population, much lower than the overweight/obese %age).

http://languagesoftheworld.info/wp-cont ... abetes.jpg


Given these maps, it seems these areas are almost like different countries.

It also seems like the areas with the greatest need are going to lose the most (and by their own choice) if access to health care insurance changes. (Not to get political, but the correlation is striking.)
Count plates, not calories. 10 years "during"
Age 67
SBMI Jan/10-30.8
1/12-26.8
3/13-24.9 +/- 8-lb. 3 yrs
9/17 22.8 (but more fluctuation)
3/18 22.2
2 yrs flux
6/21 22

There is no S better than Vanilla No S.

Elizabeth50
Posts: 187
Joined: Mon Feb 08, 2016 12:05 am

Post by Elizabeth50 » Tue Mar 28, 2017 1:31 pm

oolala53 wrote:I imagine there must be mind sets within these groups that legitimize overeating and high weights and make cutting food intake sound difficult and oppressive.
:roll:
No S Restart 05/22/19

eam531
Posts: 28
Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2014 9:17 pm
Location: Buffalo, NY

Post by eam531 » Tue Mar 28, 2017 6:11 pm

Elizabeth50 wrote:
oolala53 wrote:I imagine there must be mind sets within these groups that legitimize overeating and high weights and make cutting food intake sound difficult and oppressive.
:roll:
Elizabeth50, I concur.

Selcazare
Posts: 78
Joined: Thu Dec 03, 2015 10:06 pm

Post by Selcazare » Tue Mar 28, 2017 7:42 pm

I am not very surprised by the data, mostly because the data aligns with my experiences. I lived in Central OH for most of my childhood and early adult life where creamy casseroles, buffet binges after church and dessert with every meal were a way of life. I grew up eating homecooked meals but the portions were huge with the expectation that you'd take seconds (or thirds) and have a dessert afterwards; snacking also became a huge thing during my team sports years because every family was constantly being asked to provide a snack (even if it was a light practice for less than an hour).

After college, my husband and I moved to NC, but right on the border with TN so it was the mountainous region with some of the best food. Husband and I are well-traveled but our favorite restaurants remain within that area. Like, OH portions were huge and desserts expected although there did seem to be less emphasis on multiple plates taken per meal. I think that had to do more with wanting leftovers to reinvent.

Now husband and I live in Central OR (just east of the cities list in the data sets) where it's ridiculously easy to live a moderate life with an emphasis on healthy activities. Lots of cycling, walking and hiking in my small city. Two huge farmers market are available in the summer and there's a "locavore" store available all year round that deals with all of the local farmers so the consumer can get decently-priced, farm-fresh foods without making the rounds to all the farms weekly. Aside from the farmer's markets and locavore store, we have a Trader Joe's and Whole Foods readily available as well as several "regular" grocery stores and a few Oregon-only chains that I really love. I do find the prices on the West Coast to be more expensive than the Midwest and the South but not excessively so. It's hard to describe that there is a different culture here. Restaurant portions are smaller even if the food is just as rich; more restaurants than not here seem to be neighborhood-based so it's easier to walk than to drive. I can't say that any of these things alone have helped me lose weight but I can see that if I were raised in an environment like this, and as it comes to be the "normal" for me, it definitely helps keep me new good habits in check.

Selcazare
Posts: 78
Joined: Thu Dec 03, 2015 10:06 pm

Post by Selcazare » Tue Mar 28, 2017 7:47 pm

oolala53 wrote:I imagine there must be mind sets within these groups that legitimize overeating and high weights and make cutting food intake sound difficult and oppressive.
No, I think it's simply the American mindset of "more, more, more" and "get all that you can for a buck." Why it shows up on the body more often in these populations, I believe has more to do with biology or medical issues than any mindset.

Whosonfirst
Posts: 536
Joined: Thu Nov 16, 2006 12:32 pm

Post by Whosonfirst » Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:05 pm

Selcazare wrote:I am not very surprised by the data, mostly because the data aligns with my experiences. I lived in Central OH for most of my childhood and early adult life where creamy casseroles, buffet binges after church and dessert with every meal were a way of life. I grew up eating homecooked meals but the portions were huge with the expectation that you'd take seconds (or thirds) and have a dessert afterwards; snacking also became a huge thing during my team sports years because every family was constantly being asked to provide a snack (even if it was a light practice for less than an hour).

After college, my husband and I moved to NC, but right on the border with TN so it was the mountainous region with some of the best food. Husband and I are well-traveled but our favorite restaurants remain within that area. Like, OH portions were huge and desserts expected although there did seem to be less emphasis on multiple plates taken per meal. I think that had to do more with wanting leftovers to reinvent.

Now husband and I live in Central OR (just east of the cities list in the data sets) where it's ridiculously easy to live a moderate life with an emphasis on healthy activities. Lots of cycling, walking and hiking in my small city. Two huge farmers market are available in the summer and there's a "locavore" store available all year round that deals with all of the local farmers so the consumer can get decently-priced, farm-fresh foods without making the rounds to all the farms weekly. Aside from the farmer's markets and locavore store, we have a Trader Joe's and Whole Foods readily available as well as several "regular" grocery stores and a few Oregon-only chains that I really love. I do find the prices on the West Coast to be more expensive than the Midwest and the South but not excessively so. It's hard to describe that there is a different culture here. Restaurant portions are smaller even if the food is just as rich; more restaurants than not here seem to be neighborhood-based so it's easier to walk than to drive. I can't say that any of these things alone have helped me lose weight but I can see that if I were raised in an environment like this, and as it comes to be the "normal" for me, it definitely helps keep me new good habits in check.
Hello Selcazare, Oregon certainly has the biking-hiking mindset. My son and his family lived in Bend for a couple years, and now in Portland. The food-cart courts around Portland are great places to eat, but it would have to be an S-day or S-week when we visit.
https://twitter.com/SipeEngineering
Current weight(9/2020)-212 lbs.
Goal Weight- 205 lbs.
NoS Goal: >= 80% Success days

oolala53
Posts: 9789
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 1:46 am
Location: San Diego, CA USA

Post by oolala53 » Wed Mar 29, 2017 5:35 am

Selcazare, I think you make my point. The areas you talked about, it was common to eat heavy foods and in heavy amounts. If food is good, you eat a lot of it, and it's not part of the culture, it sounds like, to care that much about where it comes from or on holding back. That's what I mean by a mindset. Stores stock what they think there is a market for. In my neighborhood, there has been an influx of younger people over the last five years who are willing to spend more of their money on quality food. Now my little local market stocks an array of organic vegetables they never did before. The mindset of the 'hood has changed.

Though I don't doubt that genetics of families absolutely affects things, too.
Count plates, not calories. 10 years "during"
Age 67
SBMI Jan/10-30.8
1/12-26.8
3/13-24.9 +/- 8-lb. 3 yrs
9/17 22.8 (but more fluctuation)
3/18 22.2
2 yrs flux
6/21 22

There is no S better than Vanilla No S.

Selcazare
Posts: 78
Joined: Thu Dec 03, 2015 10:06 pm

Post by Selcazare » Sat Apr 01, 2017 4:02 pm

Whosonfirst wrote:My son and his family lived in Bend for a couple years...
Bend is my city! I love Portland too, and those food trucks, yeah, I need a whole week of S days when I visit.

Whosonfirst
Posts: 536
Joined: Thu Nov 16, 2006 12:32 pm

Post by Whosonfirst » Sat Apr 01, 2017 5:09 pm

Selcazare wrote:
Whosonfirst wrote:My son and his family lived in Bend for a couple years...
Bend is my city! I love Portland too, and those food trucks, yeah, I need a whole week of S days when I visit.
I went to that special hamburger place in view of the Butte in Bend one time where the burgers are as big as the plates, unreal. I was alone and stood at the back of the line, everybody in line turned around and beckoned me to go ahead of them since they had families or friends with them. Super nice people to do that! Told my son, I could live in Bend, one of my favorite places.
https://twitter.com/SipeEngineering
Current weight(9/2020)-212 lbs.
Goal Weight- 205 lbs.
NoS Goal: >= 80% Success days

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